English-taught programmes and COVID-19 questions

Updated March 26th, 2021

We look forward to welcoming you and are planning for your arrival. 

Given the current situation, you may have many unanswered questions. We hope to answer these below. 

Or contact an international student advisor for help.

Check the Belgian Coronavirus Information website for the current safety measures and its useful FAQ page too.

KdG’s response to COVID-19

What does teaching look like at KdG right now?

The Belgian consultation committee has announced that higher education is switching to distance learning.

It means:

  • All educational activities and exams will take place online from Monday, March 29 until Friday, April 2.
  • If there are exceptional reasons why essential practicals or exams cannot take place online or be postponed, they will take place on campus.
  • Teachers and student counsellors are on-hand to offer students the support they need during these difficult and uncertain times.
  • The Easter break follows from April 5 for two weeks .

The circuit breaker measures will continue until April 19 when we return to code red.

Are there welcome moments?

Yes! We are looking forward to meeting you. Our Welcoming Days for the start of the 2021-2022 academic year will take place on September 15-17, 2021.

Admissions

Can I do a language test online?

We accept online alternatives offered by Duolingo, TOEFL and IELTS (online version of the full test).

My exams have been cancelled, and I am not sure if or when I will receive my high school certificate?

Like all other countries, Belgium is currently working to resolve the impact caused by cancelled and delayed exams. We await an update from the relevant authorities. If you are affected, please email admission@kdg.be

Can I defer a year? 

We obviously hope to welcome you in September, but we realise that COVID-19 circumstances may dictate otherwise. 

If you are an enrolled first-year student (accepted and paid tuition fee) for 2021-2022, it is possible to defer for a year if you let us know by September 13, 2021. 

  • We will waive our application fee for the new academic year starting in 2022
  • You will receive a new letter of acceptance if you choose to have your tuition fees transferred
  • It is not possible to defer more than once

Student travel exemptions and visas

As a non-EU/Schengen student, am I exempt from travel restrictions to Belgium?

Yes, there are currently no travel restrictions to Belgium for non-EU/Schengen students who are accepted or enrolled on a Belgian higher education programme. However, you will need to ensure that you comply with Belgium’s current COVID-19 safety requirements. You also need to submit a passenger locator form 48 hours before arrival in Belgium.

If you are travelling from a red zone, you require a negative PCR test result before arriving in Belgium.

The test needs to be carried out at the earliest 72 hours before departure to Belgian territory. You are still required to quarantine on arrival and must undergo a mandatory test on day seven of quarantine. For full details on quarantine, self-isolation and testing, visit the Belgian Coronavirus Information website. Scroll down to the Transport and International section.   

Find out your country’s colour code on Belgium’s Foreign Affairs’ website. Scroll down to the ‘Returning from’ section.

The pandemic has delayed my visa application process. What can I do?

As a student of higher education, you are exempt from travel restrictions to Belgium. Please contact your Belgian embassy as soon possible, and highlight the importance and urgency of your visa application. You can also email us.

Preparations for arrival in Belgium

Do I need a negative COVID-19 test before arriving in Belgium?

All non-Belgian residents travelling from a red zone, require a negative PCR test result before arriving in Belgium. The test needs to be carried out at the earliest 72 hours before departure to Belgian territory. Only PCR tests for SARS CoV-2 with PCR approval are accepted. You will still need to fill in the Passenger Locator Form and quarantine. For full details on quarantine, self-isolation and testing visit the Belgian Coronavirus Information website. Scroll down to the Transport and International section.   
Find out your country’s colour code on Belgium’s Foreign Affairs’ website. Scroll down to the ‘Returning from’ section.

Do I have to fill out a Passenger Locator Form?

Yes, it is mandatory and you must submit it 48 hours before arrival in Belgium.

Where can I get more information on Belgium’s current COVID-19 measures?

Keep up-to-date with the current situation at the Covid-19 site of the Belgian government.

Will I need to quarantine on arrival in Belgium?

You need to submit a passenger locator 48 hours before arrival in Belgium. Your answers determine whether you need to self-quarantine and take a Covid-19 test. You will receive a text message alert. 

Note all travellers from red zones are required to quarantine and get tested. 

Non-Belgian residents travelling from a red zone, require a negative PCR test result before arriving in Belgium. The test needs to be carried out at the earliest 72 hours before departing for Belgium. You are still required to quarantine on arrival and must undergo a mandatory test on day seven of quarantine.

For full details on quarantine, self-isolation and testing, visit the Belgian Coronavirus Information website. Scroll down to the Transport and International section. 

Find out your country’s colour code on Belgium’s Foreign Affairs’ website. Scroll down to the ‘Returning from’ section.

General

Where can I get a Covid-19 test?

What is the current infection rate in Belgium?

Like many other parts of Europe, Belgium is currently experiencing a rise in infection rates and the government is introducing a four-week circuit breaker from March 29 to counter this increase. It follows a sustained period of relatively low numbers. The national roll-out of the coronavirus vaccine is now underway.

Why was Belgium’s initial COVID-19 mortality rate high?

Belgium authorities chose a very transparent approach, counting both confirmed and suspected COVID-19 deaths in hospitals, care homes and at home. Belgium’s thorough reporting makes comparisons with other countries difficult. By including the additional and suspected cases, the Belgian authorities believe they can assess the current situation more accurately and respond effectively to the pandemic.

How is Belgian healthcare coping during the pandemic?

Our healthcare is one of the best in the world. COVID-19 is still with us however, and Belgium's second wave saw a dramatic rise in hospital admissions. Strict safety measures have successfully reversed this increase and hospitals are resuming non-essential care following a temporary postponement.

    Useful KdG contacts